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Elections & Voting

    

2023 Tribal General Election

At the January 16, 2023, Annual General Tribal Council (GTC) meeting, the GTC approved the following dates regarding the 2023 General Election:

DATE

TIME

LOCATION

PURPOSE

Saturday, April 15, 2023

10:00 am 

Norbert Hill Center
N7210 Seminary Road
Oneida, WI 54155

Caucus / 2023 Caucus Nominee Sheet

Friday, April 21, 2023

4:30 pm

 

Application Deadline

2023 General Election Application

2023 General Election Application Log

Saturday, May 13, 2023

7:00 am-7:00 pm

Turtle School
N7125 Seminary Road
Oneida, WI 54155

SEOTS
5233 W Morgan Avenue
Milwaukee, WI 53220

2023 Primary Election

2023 Primary Tentative Results

Saturday, July 15, 2023

7:00 am-7:00 pm

Turtle School
N7125 Seminary Road
Oneida, WI 54155

SEOTS
5233 W Morgan Avenue
Milwaukee, WI 53220

2023 General Election Notice and Sample Ballot

2023 General Election Tentative Results

Wednesday, August 23, 2023

8:30 am

 

Tentative BC Meeting to Ratify Results

Have questions, comments, concerns regarding General Election information and process? Please contact the Oneida Election Board at Election_Board@oneidanation.org.

Tribal Elections

Election Basics

The General Election, and Primary Election (if required), occurs every three (3) years when the Oneida Business Committee is elected. All other elections are Special Elections. Eligible voter may cast a ballot at one of two polling locations at all elections. Picture ID must be presented in order to vote.

Applicants must provide the appropriate documentation, including but not limited to, copies of degree(s), official transcripts, and certifications as proof of qualification for the position in which they seek, where applicable. Those applications that do not have the proper back-up documentation regarding qualifications will be deemed as incomplete and applicant will not be eligible for candidacy.

Election Rules

The Oneida Election Law sets the rules for elections, recounts, and challenges.  It also sets the role and responsibilities of the Oneida Election Board.

Campaign Sign Notice

Links

Election Board

For more information

Contact the Oneida Election Board at Election_Board@oneidanation.org

 

State, Local, and Federal Elections

 

Basic Voting Information

In order to vote in Wisconsin you must:

● Be a citizen of the United States
● Be a resident of Wisconsin for at least 28 days
● Be 18 years old
● Proof of identification when voting at a polling place.  A Tribal ID is accepted.
● Not have been convicted of treason, felony or bribery, or have had your civil rights restored
● Not have been found by a court to be incapable of understanding the objective of the electoral process
● Not make or benefit from a bet or wage depending on the result of an election

Registration Deadline: 20 days before the election (or completed in the local voter registration office up to 5:00 PM the day before the election, or completed at the polling place on election day)

Click here for more information about voting.

2024 Spring General Election

In advance of the 2024 Spring General Election on April 2, 2024, the Oneida Nation and its conduit fund, Voices For Oneida, invited candidates on the ballot in certain local races to share information about themselves and their campaigns with the enrolled members of the Oneida Nation. Below are the responses that we received.

Brown County Supervisor District 24:

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ross Toellner

Why are you running for office?

As a life-long native of Brown County, I have found the area to be an amazing place to grow up and start my family. My three main goals to improve Brown County are to make taxpayers’ money work for them, increase awareness on mental health, and continue to keep our county clean and sustainable. 

What unique expertise or experience would you bring to this office? 

From the time I was in high school I have had a passion for local politics. As a student, I attended all De Pere City Council meetings. During college I was a leader in multiple organizations and a chair on the campus housing committee. I have taught in Brown County for 13 years, been a treasurer for a non-profit for eight years and worked for a local homeless shelter for the last year.

What is the most important issue in the county and how would you address it?

I believe that the mental health of my constituents is extremely important. Fixing the stigma around mental health is something that we as a county can continue to work on.  This can be solved by working with our health and human service team and finding the innovative and well-rounded solutions.

When we start to focus on mental health, we will see issues like homelessness, crime, and drug and alcohol abuse decrease. This in turn can reduce the amount of money we need to spend on reactive measures by focusing on preventative services. 

What challenges do you see coming down the road for local governments in the next decade?

Almost all counties are headed for difficult decisions in the next few years. The tax percentage that we as a county has maxed out. Over the last few years, we have had funds given to us by the national government in the form of COVID relief. That money will run out. The way Brown County has been able to increase revenue is by new building, however that is not keeping pace as it has in the past. This in turn, makes issues for county services and the increasing costs they are incurring. As costs rise, we need to either make cuts or increase revenue. 

If elected, how can you as an elected official of Brown County and the Oneida Nation work together to better all residents of the region?

I will look to be an ally and a partner to the Oneida Nation and will look to continue the services agreements that have been put in place by Brown County and the Oneida Nation. I will look to collaborate with the Oneida Nation on issues that affect them in Brown County.  I also look forward to working with the Oneida Nation on the opening of the Duck Creek Trail that would connect from Pamperin Park through Outagamie County.  I would also like to work with the Oneida on conservation of our natural resources. 


 

Vanya Koepke - Hobart Village Board Trustee

   

 

 

 

 

 

Vanya Koepke

Why are you running for office?

• I am running to fix the opioid crisis. 

• Improve roads and transportation. 

• Responsibly manage taxpayer funds.  

• Improve housing availability 

What unique expertise or experience would you bring to this office?  

My experiences include those of volunteering for multiple local organizations, currently working at Schneider National as an operations manager and my elected office experience as an incumbent Hobart Village Board Trustee. These experiences will be leveraged to communicate, collaborate, listen, and deliver results for residents of Brown County. 

What is the most important issue in the county and how would you address it? 

We must address and ultimately fix the opioid crisis. 

Addressing this program will include using the available county funds for education, preventive programs, patient support, and outpatient recovery resources. We must also engage state and federal partnerships to manage the flow of illegal drugs, drugs trafficking and additional education to proactively engage this topic. I plan to coordinate local and county resources to provide the necessary support to eradicate this problem. Further, I plan to create more public, private and non-profit partnerships to support this effort. 

What challenges do you see coming down the road for local governments in the next decade? 

• Funding, especially during inflation, is something that will always face local governments that attempt to manage responsible fiscal policies with the rising costs. 

• Managing debt on development and road projects will also be something to plan for. 

• Management of migrants and illegal aliens who may come from our southern border. 

If elected, how can you as an elected official of Brown County and the Oneida Nation work together to better all residents of the region? 

• I believe we have started a process of working well together through the Duck Creek trail project. We should keep the momentum going and finish this project. 

• Collaborate between health departments on ways to address the opioid crisis.  

• Civically engage all residents on tribal and non-tribal matters.  

• Continue to hold listening sessions to gather input from constituents. 

 


Green Bay Common Council District 11 (primary election February 20, 2024)

No photo description available.

Michael Poradek (Green Bay Common Council District 11):

Why are you running for office? 

I am proud to call Green Bay home and want to serve this community that I know and love. As a homeowner in the district for over 10 years serving our neighborhoods, I am honored to have the support of neighbors here in District 11 who have encouraged me to run for Alder. I am committed to serving as a nonpartisan official focused on the local issues that impact us every day while being responsive to constituent concerns. I hope to bring new ideas, authentic leadership, and community-focused solutions to make Green Bay an even better place to live, work, and call home.

What unique expertise or experience would you bring to this office?  

I will bring to this position a decade of professional experience in nonprofit administration and leadership, along with diverse experience in volunteer community engagement. I currently serve on the city’s Planning Commission, which focuses on economic development and housing. For the past seven years, I have served in neighborhood leadership, first for the Fireman’s Park Neighborhood and currently as Chair of the city-wide Green Bay Neighborhoods for all recognized neighborhoods. I am also privileged to serve as a Board Member for St. Vincent de Paul Green Bay, Vice President and a Brown County Trustee for the Nicolet Federated Library System Board, and as a member of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. 

What is the most important issue in the city and how would you address it? 

As alder I will work to promote: 1) Road Repair: Allocating resources for a long-term plan to repair the city’s roadways in an ongoing cycle. 2) Public Safety: In order to address current and future issues impacting our community, ensuring public safety officials have the support and training necessary to be proactive. 3) Economic Growth: Especially on our city’s west side, we need to invest in common sense economic development that benefits both residents and visitors. All of these issues are relevant to both tribal and non-tribal residents, and I look forward to continuing to build from the existing intergovernmental agreement to find ways to improve services and resources for all residents.

What challenges do you see coming down the road for local governments in the next decade? 

In the next decade, local governments and officials need to commit to increasingly practice nonpartisanship in order to work together to respond to growing local issues in our communities. Whether dealing with repairs to infrastructure, responding to health issues such as the opioid epidemic locally, budgeting to ensure quality services, or providing affordable housing options, the response to these and new challenges local governments will face in the next decade are dependent upon the ability to dialogue and find creative solutions, without gridlock from partisan politics on the local level. 

If elected, how can you as an elected official of the City of Green Bay and the Oneida Nation work together to better all residents of the region? 

I look forward to bringing a clear commitment to collaboration and open communications to my service as alder. This especially includes ongoing, intergovernmental collaboration with the Oneida Nation which is achieved through mutual respect, intentional listening, and productive dialogue based on the local issues that affect all of us. I am looking forward to meeting with Chairman Hill in late January to continue to recognize ways we can all work together effectively toward serving the needs of all residents. 



Christina Thor (Green Bay Common Council District 11):

Why are you running for office? 

As a daughter of refugees, I grew up in poverty and understood economic challenges at a young age. I was born here, and now a first-generation homeowner and mother in a community that has given us so much. District 11 is where I learned the values of hard work and caring for my neighborhood. I am running because I believe that those most affected by issues should be involved in finding solutions, and I am committed to representing all voices in my district. I hope to co-create an inclusive Green Bay with healthy homes, neighborhood jobs, and community safety with my neighbors.

What unique expertise or experience would you bring to this office?

– Experience in community organizing and advocacy: I have trained community members to become advocates because I believe it’s important that policies truly reflect the needs of communities. I have fought for equitable policies and against harmful policies that impact our families.

– Expertise in public policy: I have supported drafting local and state bills that advance equity for working families. My strong background in public policy allows me to identify and address complex issues through a racial, economic, and gender justice lens.

– Servant leadership in nonprofit management: With a decade of experience in the nonprofit sector leading with a servant leadership approach, I have a deep understanding of supporting vulnerable communities through evidence-based practices. My skills in collaboration and problem-solving, coupled with empathy and healing, makes me a compassionate and effective leader.

What is the most important issue in the city and how would you address it? 

The most important issue in the city is equity. Disparities in quality of life are often compounded by systemic inequities, leading to persistent disparities in health, education, employment, and other important areas. I would address equity by engaging with marginalized communities to understand their needs to identify where systemic barriers exist; advocating for policies and programs that promote equity, such as access to affordable housing and job placements; working with stakeholders to identify and address disparities in access to education, healthcare, and other essential services; and fostering a culture of inclusion and respect; and building bridges between communities and promote dialogue and understanding.

What challenges do you see coming down the road for local governments in the next decade?

Racial, gender, and economic inequity; land and natural resources protection and responding to climate change; economic and fiscal challenges with the need to create sustainable and fair revenue streams; increased demand for services to meet the growing demands, such as healthcare, education, and social services; and democracy protection to safeguard democratic institutions and processes, including threats such as disinformation, voter suppression, and foreign interference.

If elected, how can you as an elected official of City of Green Bay and the Oneida Nation work together to better all residents of the region? 

If elected, I would work to foster a strong, co-governing relationship between the City of Green Bay and the Oneida Nation to improve the lives of all residents in the region. I am committed to: establishing regular communication and dialogue between the city and the Oneida Nation, such as regular meetings to discuss joint initiatives and shared priorities on economic development, cultural and educational programs, and environmental initiatives; fostering mutual understanding and respect between the communities, which includes promoting cultural sensitivity training, organizing community events; and working together to address shared challenges and issues, such as racial justice, affordable housing, healthcare, and economic development

 


Green Bay Common Council District 12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bobby Lindsey (Green Bay Common Council District 12):

Why are you running for office?

I’m running for City Council because my wife, Patty, and I love Green Bay and the quality of life within our neighborhood and community. We want to help preserve the historic, traditional values and characteristics of all facets of our community. Green Bay is our retirement home, and my unique background in public service, my educational background, moral character, and genuine sense of duty to serve all Green Bay residents motivates me to want to help it remain as “the best place to live.”

What unique expertise or experience would you bring to this office?

I am a U.S. Marine Corps veteran and a retired law enforcement officer (Milwaukee, WI), where I was responsible for successfully developing and applying innovative, nontraditional (and traditional), problem-oriented and intelligence-led policing strategies and community development initiatives within diverse communities. I worked collaboratively with all community stakeholders (e.g., citizens, schools, businesses, community-based organizations, faith-based organizations, ethnic communities, etc.) to improve the quality of life throughout the city. After retirement, I was appointed as a Law Enforcement Specialist with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and served as a certified instructor with the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Artesia, New Mexico, working regularly with (and training) personnel from the U.S. Indian Police Academy, U.S. Border Patrol, United States Secret Service, Federal Air Marshals, U.S.

Capitol Police, TSA personnel, U.S. Department of Defense, and myriad law enforcement personnel from federal, state, local and tribal jurisdictions across the U.S. I hold a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Services (criminal justice concentration), a Master of Science degree in Human Services Management and Organizational Leadership, and I’ve completed all core curricula content toward a PhD (ABD) in Leadership for the Advancement of Learning and Service. I currently serve as a full-time criminal justice instructor in the Wisconsin Technical College System. Through my experiences working with the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (U.S. Indian Police Academy), I was introduced to issues pertaining to tribal courts and tribal law, as well as how crime impacts Native American communities. Moreover, I gained keen insight and experiences surrounding issues relevant to tribal law enforcement officers and their unique roles and challenges in serving their respective communities.

What is the most important issue in the city, and how would you address it?

I believe that the most important issue facing the city is the dangerous influence of partisanship in local government. Partisanship is the foundation of weakened government service toward meeting the needs of all residents within our community. Partisanship leads to prioritizing agendas established by entities from outside of our city; agendas that override the compelling needs of local residents. Several cities around the country now serve as clear examples and evidence of how partisan influences can destroy once thriving communities, as local concerns become secondary (or ignored) in order to achieve economic, social, or political objectives of outside or nonlocal interests.

My professional life of public service has always been rooted in ground level engagement, communication, and collaborative action in partnership with all community stakeholders; that will not change if given the privilege to serve our community as a member of the Green Bay Common Council. From the perspective of ground-level engagement with stakeholders, I have experienced how partisanship has often impeded serving individuals, families, neighborhoods, schools, businesses, and unique concerns of varying parts of communities. If the City of Green Bay succumbs to the influences of political partnership, it will certainly and rapidly experience many of the problems that are evident within American cities in decline.

As a public servant, my moral leadership and decision-making will always be a reflection of the expressed concerns and needs of all local stakeholders, with a particular focus on prioritizing community safety; being accessible and accountable to all stakeholders; prioritizing fiscal responsibility that supports family budgets, economic growth and strong fundamental education; and genuine respect for all stakeholders

What challenges do you see coming down the road for local governments in the next decade?

I believe that local governments will be greatly affected by threats and circumstances stemming from global and national issues over the next decade (e.g., political, economic, social, domestic, immigration, military, and terrorism-related concerns). I support serious, proactive emergency management and human services agendas and activities that can help identify and mitigate how those issues will negatively impact local governments.

If elected, how can you, as an elected official of the City of Green Bay and the Oneida Nation, work together to better all residents of the region?

 

As an elected official of the City of Green Bay, I can and will exercise and help facilitate the application and enhancement of ongoing leadership, learning, service and research competencies that can meet compelling needs of all residents and communities throughout our region.


 

 

 

 

 


Kathy Hinkfuss (Green Bay Common Council District 12):

Why are you running for office?

I have a passion for the well-being and development of our community. I have been your neighbor in District 12 for over 20 years. My husband and I raised our children in this district. My background in leadership, community building, and problem-solving are transferable skills. I will apply those skills to address the community’s challenges and encourage innovative solutions.

What unique expertise or experience would you bring to this office?

I have led a non-profit and operations for a Fortune 200 company. I recently started my own business. The skill sets required across these three sectors are quite different. One skill set remains the same: how people are treated and included in decisions that affect their lives. I will never forget my constituents and will seek out participation and feedback.

What is the most important issue in the City, and how would you address it?

One of the most significant issues is the lack of affordable housing for the younger generation and retirees. We must be innovative with planned housing developments and reduce administrative barriers to creating new homes.

What challenges do you see coming down the road for local governments in the next decade?

We have a continued challenge to increase the tax base within the city and maintain services. The City of Green Bay and the Oneida Nation have a signed intergovernmental agreement recognizing the value of shared services between the City of Green Bay and the Oneida Nation. Local governments have been sharing services in communities across Brown County. Shared services can be a way to explore new innovative ideas.

If elected, how can you, as an elected official of the City of Green Bay and the Oneida Nation, work together to better all residents of the region?

As a City Alder, I will continue to enhance the work started in District 12 and across the region. The intergovernmental agreement needs to continue. Also, I want to highlight and recognize the $800 million-plus in the current economic impact made by the Oneida Nation. Thank you!

Ways to work together:

• Continue open communication channels: Regular meetings between the City of Green Bay and the Oneida Nation leadership.

• Joint economic development initiatives: Collaborative projects that benefit the City of Green Bay and the Oneida Nation.

• Continue tourism promotion: Work together on initiatives highlighting the cultural richness and attractions that the Oneida Nation brings to Green Bay.

• Infrastructure development: Shared investment in infrastructure, road improvements, public transportation, and/or utility upgrades.

• Educational initiatives: Work together on educational programs that promote understanding and appreciation of the history, culture, and contributions of the Oneida Nation.

• Environmental stewardship: Collaborate on initiatives that promote sustainability.

These are just a few of the ideas.

The Oneida Nation is economically and culturally important to Brown County and the City of Green Bay. The Oneida Nation has advanced tourism to the city and is also the sponsor of many events hosted in the City of Green Bay.  


Outagamie County Supervisor District 33 (uncontested)

Debbie Vander Heiden (Outagamie County Supervisor District 33):

Why are you running for office?

I am a resident of the Town of Kaukauna and have been involved in town government since 1997 and presently am the Clerk/Treasurer. I have gained profound knowledge through the years with the town. I have been a County Board Supervisor since 2016. When the Supervisor from my district resigned, he contacted me to ask if I would be interested in the position because he felt I would be a suitable candidate. The County appointed me for the position, and I then decided to run for the next term. So that brings us to your first question, why am I running for office? I enjoy collaborating with people and have gained so much knowledge through the years. I look forward to meeting more people and am ready to face the new challenges.

What unique expertise or experience would you bring to this office? 

I bring with me a great deal of experience as a member of the UW Extension, Land Conservation and Zoning Committees, which I still serve on. My children were all in 4-H and I have a passion for all the different programs UW Extension has to offer. I also have experience in the land conservation area with farming and farmland preservation. They offer a lot of education for our farmers. As for zoning, I served on our local Planning Commission for six years and am still involved with them as their secretary. Zoning issues can be tough at times, however I always try to find a compromise whenever possible.

What is the most important issue in the county and how would you address it?

There are issues we are dealing with in the county such as not enough staff to deal with mental health and court cases. However, the biggest challenge we are facing now is trying to retain our qualified employees and be able to pay them the wage they deserve. With the state imposing levy limits on us, this makes it tough to find extra funding. We are working to try to find ways to get this in our 2025 budget. Another is to keep the job force strong in the county.

What challenges do you see coming down the road for local governments in the next decade?

I deal with local governments daily and we all face the same problems. Trying to produce enough funding to maintain our roads. Roads are getting increasingly costly to maintain. Local governments have levy limits also, and there is not enough money to fund them. The other is trying to fund our fire and EMR departments. Most local governments have volunteer personnel, and it is getting harder to find volunteers. Another concern is that solar farms will take away our prime farmland acres to make solar fields. I am a big supporter of farmland preservation and hope that our legislators will help us to protect our land.

If elected, how can you as an elected official of Outagamie County and the Oneida Nation work together to better all residents of the region?

I will continue to collaborate with my committees with issues that may arise between Oneida Nation and Outagamie County to do what is best for both communities. I believe in joint ventures and working together. As a member of the Land Conservation Committee, we cannot be prouder of the SHED project that was made possible by working with the Oneida Nation as a partner with this project. I went to the grand opening, and it was so great to see all the people come together and to meet all those that made it possible.

I am open to any comments or concerns my constituents may have.


Outagamie County Supervisor District 35 (uncontested)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dustin Koury (Outagamie County Supervisor District 35):

Why are you running for office?

I had the honor of being appointed to serve the remainder of the term of former Supervisor Dan Melchert last year. Mr. Melchert had a great reputation on the Board, and I think it is important that District 35 continues to have a representative who is able to maintain and build relationships with other leaders and communities in Outagamie County. Living in an area on the northern edge of the county, our communities are impacted differently than individuals who may live in Appleton or other regions of the county. I hope to bring attention to the unique needs of my neighbors.  

What unique expertise or experience would you bring to this office?

I worked as a child welfare professional in neighboring counties for almost 10 years. Those experiences taught me a lot about what families and communities sometimes need, but also about how important county government can be for its citizens when it is working well. Now, I work for the state of WI’s Department of Children and Families, and I have been able to learn about how policies, budgets, and other government decisions impacts day to day life. I promise to use those experiences to make sure that the Outagamie County Board makes responsible decisions that will make life easier for the citizens it serves. 

What is the most important issue in the county and how would you address it?

In my opinion, local governments have to be sure that they are being fiscally responsible. As everyone knows, costs are going up and county government is responsible to provide many mandated and necessary services that help our citizens. We can’t afford to reduce the quality of those services, but we must be sure that we budget responsibly so that we can continue to improve as a county. I think the most important issue facing the county will be finding ways to continue to improve the services we provide without increasing the burden on taxpayers. 

What challenges do you see coming down the road for local governments in the next decade?

In addition to the tight budgets I already referenced, I think local governments will need to continue to respectfully work together to find innovative solutions to complex issues. There are lots of things to disagree about, but I think it’s important to find areas where we can agree and to find the most effective solutions for all of our neighbors. County Board Supervisors are non-partisan positions, and I enjoy the opportunity to work alongside representatives from other areas of the county, many of which I don’t always (or even often) agree. If elected, I look forward to listening to my constituents and finding solutions to whatever tough problems arise. 

If elected, how can you as an elected official of Outagamie County and the Oneida Nation work together to better all residents of the region? 

Effective and respectful government-to-government relationships are so important. In my work at the county and state levels, I’ve had the opportunity to work alongside many members of the Oneida Nation, whether it be law enforcement, judges, or other tribe members. I learned in that work how important it is to listen to feedback from others, and I look forward to continuing partnerships however possible if elected to a full term as a County Board Supervisor. 

 

Additional/Contact Info