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Veteran Services and Resources

Healthcare

Basic Information

If you served in the active military and were separated under any condition other than dishonorable, you may qualify for VA healthcare benefits.  Current and former members of the Reserves or National Guard who were called to active duty (other than active duty for training) by a federal order and completed the full period for which they were called or ordered to active duty may be eligible for VA healthcare as well.  Most veterans who enlisted after September 7, 1980 or officers who entered active duty after October 16, 1981 must have served 24 continuous months or the full period for which they were called to active duty in order to be eligible.  This minimum duty requirement may not apply to veterans who were discharged for a disability incurred or aggravated in the line of duty, for a hardship, or early out.

VA healthcare is not medical insurance, it simply means you are in the VA healthcare system and can receive medical treatment from the VA Medical Center or VA Clinic to which you are assigned. This benefit is only for the veteran, not family members.  VA healthcare will not pay for routine treatment at a non-VA medical facility unless you were pre-approved to receive this treatment.  This is called “VA Care in the Community.”  During a medical emergency, veterans should immediately seek care at the nearest medical facility. A medical emergency is an injury, illness, or symptom so severe that without immediate treatment, you believe your life or health is in danger. If this happens, you should ask the facility to bill the VA because if they bill Medicare or another insurance, the VA will not pay the co-pay for bill.

For information on specific VA Healthcare Benefits

Pre-qualifying Factors

There are factors that will automatically qualify you for VA healthcare.  They are:

  • Purple Heart recipients,
  • Former Prisoners of War,
  • Have a compensable service-connected disability (10% or more) as determined by the VA,
  • Served in a combat theater of operations after November 11, 1998,
  • Discharged from the military for a disability incurred in the line of duty,
  • Served in Southwest Asia during the Gulf War between August 2, 1990 and November 11, 1998,
  • Served in Vietnam between January 9, 1962 and May 7, 1975,
  • Exposed to radiation while in the military,
  • Served on active duty at least 30 cumulative days at Camp Lejeune from January 1, 1957 through December 31, 1987.

If a veteran has no pre-qualifying factors, the VA will determine eligibility based on household income from all sources from the previous calendar year to include wages, social security, pensions, interest, dividends and any other source of income.  

Amounts do vary from county-to-county and state-to-state.  Your household income can be adjusted by previous calendar year household medical expenses to include, insurance premiums, Medicare, doctor and medication co-pays, dental, eye glasses, etc.

Application Process

The VA form 10-10EZ is the application used to apply for VA healthcare.  Oneida Veterans Service Office can help you with the process; however, you must be able to provide all the information on the form such as other health insurance information, household income, and out-of-pocket medical expenses.  Taking the information from your income tax return is the best way to ensure this information is accurate.  You do not have to provide this information but if you don’t provide it and you do not have any pre-qualifying factors, you will not be accepted into the VA healthcare system.  If you do have pre-qualifying factors, you may be charged co-pays if you do not provide income information.

After your application is processed, you will be notified of your enrollment status and priority group assignment.  If you requested an appointment on your initial application, your preferred facility will schedule an appointment and notify you of the time and date.

For VA Healthcare Forms click HERE

Co-pays

If you are required to pay co-pays, they are as follows:

Primary Care Services $15
Speciality Care Services $50
Medication (per prescription for a 30-day supply)  
Tier 1 (preferred generics) $5
Tier 2 (non-preferred generics and some OTC) $8
Tier 3 (brand name) $11
Annual CoPay Cap $700

Pension

Pension

The VA’s pension program provides monthly benefit payments to certain wartime veterans, or their surviving spouses, with financial need. 

Non-Service Connected Pension
Survivor’s Pension

Forms

There are several forms listed below that may be required to be filled out in order to apply for a VA pension depending on your circumstances. Please read the explanation of each form to determine whether or not you need to fill it out.

Examination for Housebound Status or Permanent Need for Regular Aid and Attendance

VA Form 21-2680

In order for the VA to determine whether or not a veteran or surviving spouse who receives in-home care or is in an assisted living facility meets the criteria for housebound or aid and attendance, their primary care provider must fill out and sign a VA form 21-2680. Along with the form, the provider must state due to a physical, mental, developmental, or cognitive disorder, the veteran or surviving spouse requires the health care or custodial care that an in-home attendant or assistant living facility provides. The specific disability or disabilities should also be provided in the statement.

Request for Nursing Home Information in Connection with Claim for Aid and Attendance

VA Form 21-0779

Any veteran or surviving spouse permanently residing in a nursing home must have their nursing home fill out this form. If a veteran is married, a separate form is required for their spouse, too.

Worksheet for an Assisted Living, Adult Day Care, or a Similar Facility

VA Form 21P-527EZ-Page-10 (for veteran) VA Form 21P-534EZ-Page-13, Page 12 (for survivor)

Any veteran or surviving spouse permanently residing in a assisted living facility or who attends adult day care or a similar facility must have the facility fill out this form. If a veteran living in an assisted living facility is married, a separate form is required for their spouse, too. Along with this form, a current statement showing the fees the veteran or surviving spouse pays to the assisted living facility and a breakdown of the care received is also required.

Worksheet for In-home Attendant Expenses

VA Form 21P-527EZ-Page-11 (for veteran) VA Form 21P-534EZ-Page-13 (for survivor)

This will need to be completed by the veteran or surviving spouse if they are permanently in need of a caregiver. If a caregiver is paid to perform at least two Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), the VA may count the cost of in-home care as a medical expense.  ADLs are defined as basic self-care, including bathing or showering, dressing, eating, transferring (getting in or out of bed or a chair), and using the toilet.

Attendant Affidavit / In-Home Attendant Breakdown

Attendant-Affidavit-with-In-Home-Attendant-Breakdown

This will need to be completed by the veteran’s or surviving spouse’s caregiver, if applicable.  If a caregiver is paid to perform at least two Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), the VA may count the cost of in-home care as a medical expense.  ADLs are defined as basic self-care, including bathing or showering, dressing, eating, transferring (getting in or out of bed or a chair), and using the toilet.

Questionnaire for Farm Income

VA Form 21P-4165

If the veteran or surviving spouse owns a farm, this form is needed to report income from that farm.

Income From Property or Business

VA Form 21P-4185

If the veteran or surviving spouse owns rental property or a business, this form is needed to report that income.

Service Connected Disability

Service Connected disabilities are disabilities determined by the VA to be an injury or illness that was incurred or aggravated during or due to active military service.

The VA has recognized Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s Disease) diagnosed in veterans with 90 days or more of continuous active service in the military as being caused by their military service regardless of what branch they served in or when and where they served. For some unknown reason, research has shown that veterans have a 50-60% higher chance of being diagnosed with ALS than non-veterans.

Filing A Claim

If you are filing a service-connected disability claim and you were discharged from the military less than one year ago, the VA will more than likely presume your disabilities were caused or aggravated by your military service as long as there is documentation in your service medical record and it did not exist prior to entry onto active duty. If it was more than a year, you will have to prove your claimed disability was caused or aggravated by your military service. Things that can help prove this include, but are not limited to:

  • Documented treatment for injury or illness in your service medical record for non-presumptive conditions.
  • A history of medical documentation from a VA or civilian healthcare provider after you were discharged from the military.
  • Statements from people you were stationed with in the military that witnessed the accident that caused your service-connected disability or people who were aware of your disability.  For example, a best friend who knew you had chronic low back pain that you rarely sought treatment for.  These are referred to as “buddy statements.”
  • A letter from your doctor stating your disability was “at least as likely as not” or “more than likely” related to your military service.  This letter must state the doctor’s reasons and basis for his/her opinion.

It’s strongly recommended you utilize your Oneida Veterans Service Officer to assist you with filing your claim.  In order to make the claim process go more smoothly, you must be able to provide the Veterans Service Officer with pertinent information about the disability or disabilities you’re claiming. If you don’t have the following information when you arrive for your appointment, it may have to be rescheduled:

  • Disability/injury:  This is the medical disability you are claiming. 
  • Began/diagnosed:  This is the date the disability began or you were first injured or diagnosed.  You need to provide at least the month and year to the best of your ability.
  • When treated:  This is the date or dates (month and year) you received treatment for your disability. 
  • Medical facility:  This is the medical facility where you were treated.
  • Address:  This is the address of the medical facility. We can also Google the address as long as you know the name of the facility. 

If you do not know dates of treatment (month and year) or the name of a medical facility, you cannot use it for your claim. We have to have this information in order to get the medical records. If you’re not sure of the date but you know you were treated by a certain medical facility sometime in 2005 (for example), you can tell us you were treated between January-December 2005.  This will ensure that no matter what month in 2005 you were treated, we will be able to get the records. 

We will not pay for medical records. If we request medical records and the medical facility will not release them without payment, it is your responsibility to pay the fee and obtain the records. If you do not/cannot pay the fee, the records will not be used as evidence for your claim.

For information regarding specific service connected disability information:

Gulf War Illness
Agent Orange
Camp Lejeune Water Contamination
100% Disability Benefits

Death and Burial

The VA administers a burial benefits program designed to assist eligible claimants in helping with funeral and burial costs of a deceased veteran. The following benefits may be available:

Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC)

Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) is a monthly benefit paid to eligible survivors of deceased veterans.

**Under no circumstance does the widow(er) receive the veteran’s benefits after the veteran passes away.**

Veteran Cemeteries

Wisconsin State Veteran Cemeteries

Burial Allowance

If a veteran’s death is service connected, the VA will pay a burial allowance of $2,000 for deaths on or after September 11, 2001. For deaths prior to that date, the allowance was $1,500. 

If a veteran’s death is not service connected and he/she was discharged under conditions other than dishonorable, the VA may pay funeral and burial expense payments. This payment is $300-$700 for funeral expenses and $300-700 for burial expenses. Effective October 1, 2011, the VA will pay $700 for funeral expenses if a veteran was properly hospitalized at a VA facility or in a VA-authorized facility. If not, the benefit pays $300.  Effective October 1, 2011, the VA will pay $700 for burial expenses. Prior to that date, the allowance was $300. An annual increase in burial expenses for deaths occurring after October 1, 2011, began in fiscal year 2013 based on the Consumer Price Index for the preceding 12-month period. Effective October 1, 2019, that amount is $796 (vice $700). This benefit is paid if:

  • The veteran was in receipt of VA pension or compensation at the time of death, or
  • The veteran was, at the time of death, receiving military retired pay in lieu of compensation, or
  • The veteran had, at the time of death, an original or reopened VA claim pending and had been found entitled to compensation or pension from a date prior to the date of death, or
  • The veteran’s death occurred in a VA facility, or
  • The veteran died while traveling under proper authorization and at VA expense to or from a specified place for the purpose of examination, treatment or care, or
  • The veteran died on or after October 9, 1996, while a patient at an approved state nursing home or while residing in an approved state nursing home, is transferred to a non-VA facility for acute medical care, and then dies at that location, or
  • The veteran’s remains are being held by a state or political subdivision of a state, there is no next of kin or other person claiming the body, and the veteran’s estate does not have enough resources to cover the cost of the funeral and burial. The veteran must have served during wartime or was released from active service for a disability incurred or aggravated in the line of duty.

Payment may be made to the creditor who provided services or furnished merchandise in connection with burial, funeral, transportation, plot or interment; or the person or persons whose personal funds were used to pay such expenses; or the representative of the estate of the deceased veteran when estate funds were used to pay the expenses.

Flag

The VA shall furnish one United States flag at no cost to the family of a veteran who served honorably in the U.S. armed forces or for reservists or National Guard members who:

  • Completed at least one enlistment or, in the case of an officer, completed the period of initial obligated service, or
  • Was discharged before completion of the initial enlistment for a disability incurred or aggravated in the line of duty, or
  • Who died while an active member.

Grave Markers

Prior to November 1, 1990, the VA will furnish a grave marker for eligible veterans’ graves if they are not marked with a private marker. For deaths occurring on or after that date, the VA will furnish a grave marker for eligible veterans’ graves even if they are marked with a private marker. Eligible veterans are veterans who:

  • Served honorably in the U.S. armed forces. After September 7, 1980, the veteran must have served for a minimum of 24 months or the full period for which the veteran was called to active duty unless special circumstances make them otherwise eligible such as the veteran died on active duty, or
  • Reservists or National Guard members who, at the time of death, were entitled to retired pay or would have been entitled but for being under the age of 60, or
  • Reservists or National Guard members who died while on active duty or as a result of training. Members who only have active duty service for training are not eligible.

Veterans must be buried in cemeteries. Burial on private land renders a veteran’s grave ineligible for a VA grave marker. Spouses and dependents are only eligible for VA grave markers if buried in a national or state veterans cemetery.

There are six options of markers available:

  • Flat Bronze
  • Flat Marble or Granite
  • Upright Marble or Granite
  • Bronze Niche

There is an option of religious symbols to be placed on the marker. To view them all click HERE.

Medallion

The VA also offers a medallion that can be placed on a private marker in lieu of a VA grave marker. The medallion comes in 1 1/2″, 3″, and 5″, and they are not personalized like the grave marker.

Presidential Memorial Certificate

The VA will provide, at no expense, certificates which honor the veteran’s memory. These certificates are stamped with the current president’s signature and can be requested for as many family members as desired.

Education

Montgomery GI Bill

The Montgomery GI Bill (MGIB) is available to those who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces. There are two main programs:

  • Montgomery GI Bill Active Duty
    For active duty members who enroll and pay $100 per month for 12 months and are then entitled to receive a monthly education benefit once they have completed a minimum service obligation.
    Benefits are payable for 10 years following your release from honorable active service.
  • Montgomery GI Bill Selected Reserve
    For Reservists with a six-year obligation in the Selected Reserve who are actively drilling.
    Your eligibility for the program ends the day you leave the Selected Reserve.

Post 9/11 GI Bill

For approved programs, the Post-9/11 GI Bill provides up to 36 months of education benefits. 

If your release from active duty was before January 1, 2013, there is a 15-year time limitation for use of benefits.  For individuals whose last discharge date is on or after January 1, 2013, the time limitation has been removed. 

For more information click HERE.

Vocational Rehabilitation

You may receive Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment services to help with job training, employment accommodations, resume development, and job seeking skills coaching for those who are disabled and unable to work in traditional employment.

Eligibility

Active Duty Servicemembers are eligible if they:

  • Expect to receive an honorable or other than dishonorable discharge upon separation from active duty
  • Obtain a memorandum rating of 20% or more from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and
  • Apply for VR&E services

Or

  • Are participating in the Integrated Disability Evaluation System (IDES) or are certified by the military as having a severe injury or illness that may prevent them from performing their military duties
  • Apply for VR&E services, and
  • Report for an evaluation with a VR&E counselor before separating from active duty

Veterans are eligible if they:

  • Have received a discharge that is other than dishonorable
  • Have a service-connected disability rating of at least 10% from VA
  • Apply for VR&E services

Basic period of Eligibility

The basic period of eligibility ends 12 years from the date of notification of one of the following:

  • Date of separation from active military service, or
  • Date the Veteran was first notified by VA of a service-connected disability rating.

For more information click HERE.

Wisconsin GI Bill

The Wisconsin GI Bill waives full tuition and segregated fees for eligible veterans and their dependents for up to eight semesters or 128 credits, whichever is greater, at any University of Wisconsin System or Wisconsin Technical College System school​.

Eligibility

Qualifying Veteran

A qualifying Veteran is either a current Wisconsin resident who was either:

  • A Wisconsin resident at the time of entry into active military service.
  • A Wisconsin resident for at least five consecutive years preceding the beginning of any semester or session for which he or she registers at a qualifying institution.

Eligible Family Member

A qualifying Veteran’s spouse or child may use this benefit if the Veteran has been awarded a service connected disability rating of at least 30% by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or died in the line of duty or as a result of a service connected disability.
The spouse or child must meet the same residency requirements as the Veteran.

Military Service Requirements

The individual upon whom eligibility is based (qualifying Veteran) must meet one of the following:

  • Served on active duty 90 days or more during a war period
  • Served on active duty at least two continuous years or full initial service obligation during peacetime
  • Regardless of length of active duty, was honorably discharged due to:
    • Service-connected disability
    • Disability subsequently adjudicated to have been service connected
    • Reduction in the U.S. armed forces
  • Received the:
    • Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
    • Vietnam Service Medal
    • Navy Expeditionary Medal
    • Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal
  • Served for any period under Section 1 of Executive Order 10957 dated August 10, 1961

For more information click HERE.

Dependent Education Assistance

If you’re the child or spouse of a Veteran or service member who has died, is captured or missing, or has VA service connected disabilities, you may be able to get help paying for school or job training. Dependent Education Assistance (DEA) is a monetary benefit that can be used for whatever is needed.

Eligibility

You may be able to get these benefits if both you and the Veteran or service member meet certain eligibility requirements.

One of the descriptions below must be true. The Veteran or service member:

  • Is permanently and totally disabled due to a service-connected disability, or
  • Died while on active duty or as a result of a service-connected disability, or
  • Is missing in action or was captured in the line of duty by a hostile force, or
  • Was forcibly detained (held) or interned in the line of duty by a foreign entity, or
  • Is in the hospital or getting outpatient treatment for a service-connected permanent and total disability and is likely to be discharged for that disability (effective December 23, 2006)

If you’re the child of a Veteran or service member

  • You can get benefits if you’re between the ages of 18 and 26, except in certain cases. You may be married or unmarried.
  • If you’re over 18 years old and using DEA, you can’t get Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) from the VA.

If you’re the spouse of a Veteran or service member

  • Your benefits start on the date we conclude that you qualify or on the date of the Veteran’s death, and last for 10 years.
  • If we rated the Veteran as permanently and totally disabled, with an effective date that’s 3 years after discharge, you’ll qualify for benefits for 20 years from that effective date. This new policy began on October 10, 2008. We won’t pay benefits for training you started before this date.
  • If the service member died on active duty, your benefits end 20 years from the date of death.
  • You can get DIC payments from the VA and use DEA benefits.

For more information click HERE.

ID Cards

Military ID Card

This card is only issued to current active duty, National Guard and Reserve Members. It’s used to show your military status and to get access to services at military bases.

Retired ID Card

A Department of Defense (DoD) Retired Identification Card is used to show your military status and to get access to services at military bases. You may also use this card to get discounts offered to Veterans at many stores, businesses, and restaurants. If you have a DoD Identification Card, you don’t need to request another type of photo ID card to prove you’re a Veteran or to get retail or business discounts.

A Department of Defense (DoD) 100% VA Disabled Veteran or Dependent Identification Card is used to get access to services at military bases. You may also use this card to get discounts offered to Veterans at many stores, businesses, and restaurants. If you have a DoD Identification Card, you don’t need to request another type of photo ID card to prove you’re a Veteran or to get retail or business discounts.

DOD ID CARDS:
There are only a few places in the state you can get or renew these IDs. The two nearest are in Green bay or Chippewa Falls. To schedule an appointment in Green Bay click HERE

VA Healthcare Enrollee ID Card

When you’re enrolled in VA health care, you get a Veteran Health Identification Card (VHIC) that you use to check in to your appointments at VA medical centers. You may also use this card to get discounts offered to Veterans at many stores, businesses, and restaurants. If you have a VHIC, you don’t need to request another type of photo ID card to prove you’re a Veteran or to get retail or business discounts.

A Veteran ID Card (VIC) is a form of photo ID you can use to get discounts offered to Veterans at many stores, businesses, and restaurants. In order to be eligible for this ID card, veterans had to have served on active duty and received an honorable or general discharge. Or were in the Reserves, or National Guard and had federal activation, title 10 or executive order, and received an honorable or general discharge. When you have this card, you won’t need to carry around your military discharge papers or share sensitive personal information to receive discounts. If you have a VIC, you don’t need to request another type of photo ID card to prove you’re a Veteran or to get retail or business discounts.
To apply for a Veteran ID Card click HERE.

State Veteran Identifier

The state of Wisconsin offers a Veteran designation (an identifying mark) printed on state-issued driver’s licenses or IDs. If you have a Veteran’s designation, you may be able to get discounts offered to Veterans at many stores, businesses, and restaurants.

To get the veteran identifier on your driver license or ID card:

  • Verify your eligibility​ with the Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs. Contact the Veterans Benefits Resource Center at: 1-800-WIS-VETS or VetExpress​. ​
    Or,
    ​​​Cont​act your local County Veterans Service Officer to obtain certification of your veteran status for the identifier.
  • ​Once you’ve established eligibility, you may apply at the Wisconsin DMV. If renewing or getting your first driver license or ID card, you’ll need to visit your local DMV. If it’s not time to renew, you have the option to get a duplicate product online.

Eligibility for Veteran ID Card and state Veteran Identifier

To be eligible you must meet certain requirements related to your term and characterization of military service.
Character of Service:  The Character of Service Field on your DD214/DD215 must show, Honorable, General under honorable conditions, or Honorable under General. (Other than Honorable conditions will not allow you to certify through this process.)
Length of Service:  You must have at least one period of service that encompassed at least two continuous years of active duty or 90 days of active duty during a designated wartime period, where the character of service meets the requirements above.

* For this purpose, “active duty” means active duty other than active duty for training (ACDUTRA). Military service in the armed forces of the United States or in forces incorporated as part of the armed forces of the United States. Full-time National Guard duty or Reserve duty, weekend drill does not qualify as “active duty” under federal law. Active federal military service performed by the National Guard members under Title 10 of the U.S. Code or executive order may qualify as “active duty.”

Homeless Veterans

There are two main sources of assistance to help homeless or at risk of homelessness veterans in Oneida County.

Veterans Outreach and Recovery Program (VORP)

VORP is a Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs (WDVA) program designed to connect veterans to community services and to provide case management and support.

Oneida is in Regions 6 and 7.
To reach the VORP Representative for Region 6 call: (920) 246-7277 
To reach the VORP Representative for Region 7 call: (715) 409-3767

For more information click HERE.

Supportive Services for Veterans Families (SSVF)

The Supportive Service for Veterans and Families grants are awarded to private non-profit organizations that will assist low-income Veterans and Veteran Families residing in or transitioning to permanent housing.  Grantees will provide a range of supportive services to eligible Veteran families that are designed to promote housing stability. 
 
Who is eligible to participate in the SSVF Program:
 
  • A member of a “Veteran family”.  Either a Veteran, or a member of a family in which the head of household, or the spouse of the head of household, is a Veteran.
  • Very low-income; Household income does not exceed 50% of area median income.   The VA uses the median income for an area or community determined using the income limits most recently published by the Development for programs under section 8 of the US Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437f), which can be found at www.huduser.org/portal/datasets/il.html.
 
This information should be helpful in order to direct these services to a veteran or a veteran family in need.  To qualify for the other benefits listed below as part of the grant, a Veteran or Veteran Family must first meet the requirements for the housing need.  
 
Updated: Services available, may vary based on grantee providing the services 
  • Vocational and rehabilitation counseling
  • Employment and training service
  • Educational assistance
  • Health care services
  • Daily living services
  • Personal financial planning services
  • Transportation services
  • Income support services
  • Fiduciary and representative payee services
  • Legal services
  • Child care services
  • Housing counseling services
 
Including time-limited payments to third parties (temporary financial assistance payments on behalf of Veterans families to landlords, utility companies, moving companies, and eligible child care providers) provided these payments help Veteran Families remain in permanent housing or obtain permanent housing and meet other requirements per VA regulations.  Examples:  For veterans with a Hud-Vash voucher this program can pay the security deposit, and if required by the landlord the first month rent.  For veterans not entitled to Hud-Vash or those leaving transitional housing this program can pay for the security deposit, first month rent and eviction prevention if required.   
 
The Federal VA has just awarded yearly renewal grants for the following Wisconsin organizations to continue to provide SSVF services to veterans and veterans with families beyond October 1, 2014:
 
  • Center for Veterans Issues – Milwaukee: serving 20 counties, $2,000,000
  • Veterans Assistance Foundation – Tomah: serving 38 counties, $619,400
  • Community Action Coalition for South Central WI – Madison: serving 3 counties, $322,500
  • Indianhead Community Action Agency – Ladysmith: serving 6 counties, $218,862
  • Transitional Living Services – McHenry, IL: serving Kenosha and 3 Illinois counties, $341,204

For more information click HERE.

Commonly Used Forms

Listed below are some of the forms that are commonly requested by veterans. These forms are being made available in case coming to our office during our working hours is difficult for you; however, we are here to help you with them if you prefer that.

If you complete the forms on your own, we do recommend you bring them to us and let us submit them. Often times, we have ways of submitting them faster than by mail.

VA Forms

  • Statement in Support of Claim (21-4138)
  • Change of Address (20-572)
  • Change/Enrollment of Direct Deposit (24-0296)
  • Add or Remove Dependents (21-686c)
  • Intent to File (21-0966)
  • VA Backed Home Loan Certificate of Eligibility (26-1880)
  • Release of VA health record to private medical facilities (10-0485)
    (This is required for sharing information when using Community Care) 

Federal Forms

Wisconsin State Forms

Additional/Contact Info